How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War

By Victor Brooks; Robert Hohwald | Go to book overview

Introduction

On the chilly, early spring afternoon of April 9th, 1765, King George III requested that George Grenville become the prime minister of the British government. This humorless brother-in-law of the famous William Pitt was appointed with the specific mandate to devise a plan to generate revenue from His Majesty's American colonies that seemed either unwilling or unable to defend themselves against French or Indian aggression. Grenville agreed with his king that the Americans might be industrious farmers, but these "country people" seemed incapable of ever becoming effective soldiers comparable to the redcoats recruited form the British Isles. The result of this set of beliefs was the passage of a Stamp Act designed to raise money to support several regiments of British regulars in garrisons throughout the colonies. Grenville and the king were certain that any colonial opposition to this modest tax would be disorganized and brief and His Majesty's regulars could be expected to maintain order in the colonies for decades to come.

Exactly one hundred years to the day after a British king set in motion a chain of events that would ultimately cost the crown its most valuable colonies, an American general wearing a mud splattered uniform met with his gray coated counterpart to accept the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. Ulysses Simpson Grant commanded an army that was over ten times the size of the British army of a century earlier and had just defeated a Confederacy that had fielded an army just as brave, resourceful and tenacious as its Union opponents. Now the northern and southern descendants of the men who had opposed Grenville's Stamp tax and defeated the British army sent to force the rebel colonists into submission were once again united in a single republic. As the guns around Appomattox, Virginia were silenced, Robert E. Lee spoke to his defeated army and, as tears came to his eyes, told his men to "be as good citizens as you have been good soldiers," a charge that set in motion a reconciliation between the two

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.