How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War

By Victor Brooks; Robert Hohwald | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
The War for the North
Country

The Genesis and Climax of the Saratoga
Campaign

William Howe's offensive against New York and New Jersey during 1776 was expected to play the dominant role in forcing the rebellious colonists to submit to imperial rule. However, this campaign had been designed in Whitehall as part of a two pronged advance that would not only secure New York City as a major base, but also effectively split the New England provinces from the rest of the rebel alliance. The British attempt to coordinate parallel campaigns against the American rebels would not only demonstrate the ineptitude of the ministry in exercising control over imperial military resources, but would ultimately result in the loss of an entire field army in one of the most decisive turning points of the entire revolution.

The sequence of events that entered a climax with the surrender of 7000 British and German soldiers at Saratoga, New York had its genesis in an aborted American offensive initiated almost two years earlier. During the autumn of 1775 George Washington and a number of congressional leaders developed an increasing interest in the potential political and military benefits of adding the province of Canada to the thirteen colonies already in conflict with the British ministry. Eventually two American expeditionary forces were raised and equipped to invade Canada from different directions. While a New York based column under General Richard Montgomery marched from Fort Ticonderoga up Lake Champlain and on to the St. Lawrence River, a contingent of New England volunteers under Colonel Benedict Arnold followed the far more treacherous route up the Kennebec River toward the Chaudiere Valley near Quebec. The Americans were convinced that the Canadian governor, Sir Guy Carleton, could not effectively cover two invasion routes with less than 1000 available regulars and

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.