How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War

By Victor Brooks; Robert Hohwald | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 21
Alternative Strategies and
Outcomes

Mexico and the United States 1836-1848

The chronicle of the conflict between the United States and Mexico presents one of the relatively rare instances in modern history in which one nation defeated its adversary in every major battle of a moderately extended struggle. However, the outcome of the war was certainly not a pre-ordained American triumph, as the republic of Mexico enjoyed the advantages of a much larger and much more experienced army at the outset of the conflict. Thus a summary analysis of the Mexican-American War might reasonably focus on three inter-related problems. First, why did a consistently outnumbered American army fighting largely on enemy soil win virtually every engagement? Second, what are some of the alternative outcomes that might have emerged in Mexico's conflict with the Texan rebels and the United States Army? Finally, to what extent was the American experience in the war with Mexico a precursor of the far more colossal struggle between Union and Confederacy just over a decade after the end of the conflict with the other major republic in North America?

The record of American military engagement in the contest against Mexico presents some startling contrasts. On the one hand, only 930 regulars and 600 volunteers were killed in action during the course of the war. However, 6000 volunteers and 5000 regulars died of disease or accidents while an additional 9000 volunteers and 4000 regulars were so badly wounded that they had to be discharged from the army and sent home. Thus almost one American in four who volunteered for service in the Mexican war either went home seriously injured or didn't go home at all. While these losses did not approach the carnage of the Civil War or even World War II, they are, proportional to the overall population, remarkably similar to the American involvement in World War I, which also presents a very similar

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.