How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War

By Victor Brooks; Robert Hohwald | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 27
Alternative Strategies and
Outcomes

Union and Confederate 1861-1862

The inability of either Union or Confederate offensives to end the conflict in 1862 ensured that the Civil War would be far bloodier and all-compassing than most people had imagined when the first shell arched high over Charleston harbor the previous April. The first year and a half of the war, from Fort Sumter to Perryville, caused more American casualties than the Revolution, War of 1812 and Mexican War combined, and yet was merely the opening act of an even more brutal bloodletting that would terminate at Appomattox Court House. However, while this period was only one stage of a larger conflict, it is fascinating to speculate about the implications for the future of American society if either Union or Confederacy had been able to win a clear cut victory, before the nature and scope of the war began to change in the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation and the even greater mobilization of men and resources that began in 1863.

A consideration of possible alternative scenarios of events that occurred in 1861 and 1862 virtually encourages that ever tantalizing question—could either North or South have actually won the Civil War during its early stage, and if that is the case, which factors might have produced this quite different outcome? While the Civil War fits into a four-year epoch that coincidentally also almost perfectly spans the Presidential term of Abraham Lincoln, there is nothing in historical precedent that defines civil wars as four-year struggles. The Spanish Civil War of the 1930's lasted only little more than half as long as the American version while the English Civil War, measured from the rising of the King's standard in 1642 to the execution of Charles II in 1649 was nearly twice as long as the War Between the States. Thus, theoretically, the Civil War could have ended in one campaign in a sort of bloodier version of Shay's Rebellion or the Whiskey Rebellion, or could have

-355-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How America Fought Its Wars: Military Strategy from the American Revolution to the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.