Teaching for Tenure and Beyond: Strategies for Maximizing Your Student Ratings

By Franklin H. Silverman | Go to book overview

1

Teach Acceptably or Perish!

College teaching is unique as a profession. Job security and advancement (i.e., promotion and tenure) are largely determined by the excellence of performance of tasks other than the one the person was hired to do (i.e., teach). Such tasks include publishing, securing extramural funding (grant writing), and being willing to function as a team member, including doing a fair share of committee work and advising (collegiality).

While teaching well, by itself, is unlikely to yield job security and advancement for an assistant professor, a failure to teach well (e.g., receiving low teacher ratings from students) can reduce the likelihood of achieving both, unless he or she by the end of the probationary period has developed a strong national reputation as a scholar (through publications) and/or has generated a great deal of extramural grant funding. At the very least, it is highly likely to keep him or her from being awarded promotion and tenure before the “up or out” year. During my 30-plus years in academia, there was rarely a case in my college of someone who didn’t have excellent teacher ratings being awarded promotion and tenure before the end of their probationary period. The few exceptions were persons who had generated a great deal of extramural funding and/or had exceptional publication records.

While teaching well, by itself, is unlikely to yield job security and advancement, not doing so is likely to make it more difficult to achieve both. Therefore, unless you’re willing to risk your future on becoming a publishing and/or extramural funding superstar, you’d be wise to invest in becoming at least an adequate teacher, because doing so reduces the likelihood of your perishing (i.e., being terminated by the end of your probationary period). Furthermore, unless it’s a “turn-on” for you to be hated by students, teaching well can make your job more enjoyable!

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching for Tenure and Beyond: Strategies for Maximizing Your Student Ratings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 231

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.