Teaching for Tenure and Beyond: Strategies for Maximizing Your Student Ratings

By Franklin H. Silverman | Go to book overview
Save to active project

10

Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning

Students teach themselves and our obligation is to provide an environment that can facilitate their doing so—one that is conducive to learning and extends beyond the classroom. In this chapter we will consider some of the characteristics of such an environment as well as some of the ways that each can be created, facilitated, and/or augmented. The order in which the characteristics are dealt with is mostly an arbitrary one and, consequently, doesn’t necessarily indicate the amount that each impacts on learning.


STUDENTS BELIEVE THAT THE TEACHER IS A FAIR, WARM, AND CARING PERSON

Many of the students we interviewed mentioned that it’s difficult for them to learn when they have a teacher whom they don’t regard as being fair, warm, and caring. A few of them, in fact, commented that one of the most valuable things they learned from a particular teacher was the importance of being fair, warm, and/or caring in professional interpersonal relationships.

If you are a person who is fair, warm and caring, you’ll obviously want to communicate being so to your students. You do this by interacting with them, both inside and outside of the classroom, in ways that are likely to convey this message. There are a number of do’s and don’ts for doing so in Chapters 12 and 15.


POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT IS USED FAR MORE OFTEN THAN PUNISHMENT

For establishing an environment conducive to learning, positive reinforcement would translate into encouragement and punishment into dis-

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching for Tenure and Beyond: Strategies for Maximizing Your Student Ratings
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 231

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?