Social Comparison, Social Justice, and Relative Deprivation: Theoretical, Empirical, and Policy Perspectives

By John C. Masters; William P. Smith | Go to book overview

of the simulation heuristic ( Kahneman & Tversky, 1982). The resulting conceptualization not only permits reinterpretation of inconsistent results of previous research on relative deprivation but also demonstrates the promise of recent work in social cognition for the understanding of social justice phenomena.

The last two chapters are very different from the earlier chapters and from each other in their perspectives on social comparison and social justice. Graziano examines the kinds of conceptual analyses that have dominated much theory and research in social development. Using work on the development of social justice as an illustration, he finds the typical social cognitive development approach wanting. He points out that structural cognitive approaches ignore the influence of context-dependent experiences on behavior related to social justice and argues for an approach that takes context in all of its manifestations seriously. Cook and Curtin, on the other hand, examine the policy-related issue of how the general public perceives the underclass in the United States, which is clearly an issue of social justice, by applying concepts from social comparison.

The coherence of these varied contributions stems from their common relevance for the analysis of social justice phenomena. Some important areas of thought related to social justice have been omitted, such as procedural justice (although Folger's contribution does incorporate concepts from this area) and work on the specific roles of sex and ethnicity in social justice behavior (e.g., Major, McFarlin, & Gaynor, 1984).

The present volume brings together the perspectives of one set of scholars interested in theory and research on the topics of social comparison, social justice, and relative deprivation from the perspective of adult behavior and development. The goal is to foster, through illustration and exhortation, continued research and theory development in this important sector of the boundary between social and developmental psychology and to alert the reader to the larger boundary between this domain of psychology and social issues in contemporary society.


REFERENCES

Adams J. S. ( 1965). Inequity in social exchange. In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 2). New York: Academic.

Brickman P., & Bulman R. J. ( 1977). Pleasure and pain in social comparison. In J. Suls & R. L. Miller (Eds.), Social comparison processes: Theoretical and empirical perspectives. Washington: Hemisphere.

Deutsch M. ( 1975). Equity, equality, and need: What determines which value will be used as the basis for distributive justice? Journal of Social Issues, 31, 137-150.

-6-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Comparison, Social Justice, and Relative Deprivation: Theoretical, Empirical, and Policy Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.