Social Comparison, Social Justice, and Relative Deprivation: Theoretical, Empirical, and Policy Perspectives

By John C. Masters; William P. Smith | Go to book overview

of self-control to which people actively aspire so that they may interact effectively with others. Many other theories emphasize social controls designed to prevent anarchy and perpetuate ingroup/outgroup differentiation. Personal control seems inherently more optimistic and effective than social control. Furthermore, I have proposed that the need to perceive oneself as deserving and fair is a fundamental aspect of the selfconcept. Conceptualizing justice as one motivational aspect of the self places it in the context of other, more general psychological processes. It also begins to suggest some interpretations of how reasonable people seeking reasonable solutions to important problems can want to do the fair thing and still disagree.


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Deutsch M. (in press). Distributive justice: A social psychological perspective. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

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