Social Comparison, Social Justice, and Relative Deprivation: Theoretical, Empirical, and Policy Perspectives

By John C. Masters; William P. Smith | Go to book overview

ferences will lead to a new sense of solidarity between poet and reader, for the poet refers to the reader as: "Hypocrite lecteur, mon semblable, moll frère" (p. 52).


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

This speculative essay is dedicated to the memory of Philip Brickman whose work on the avoidance of painful social comparisons and on the latent assumptions of relative deprivation theory figures prominently in the argument. Special thanks are extended to Martha Bays, Linnea Berg, Fay Cook, Christopher Jencks, Melvin M. Mark, Thomas F. Pettigrew, and Ronald Poulson for inciteful comments and to Kathleen McGraw, Dennis Rosenbaum, Diana T. Slaughter and Karl E. Taeuber for assistance during preparation of the paper.


REFERENCES

Adams J. S. ( 1965). "Inequity in social exchange". In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 2). New York: Academic Press.

Alston J. P. & Dean K. I. ( 1972). "Socioeconomic factors associated with attitudes toward welfare recipients and the causes of poverty". Social Service Review, 46, 12-23.

Auletta K. ( 1982). The underclass. New York: Random.

Barton J. J. ( 1975). Peasants and strangers: Italians, Rumanians, and Slovaks in an American city, 1890-1950. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Baudelaire C. ( 1978). "Au lecteur". In Les fleurs du mal. Paris: Imprimerie Nationale.

Bayles M. ( 1985). "Blacks on TV: Adjusting the image". New Perspectives, 17( 3), 2-6.

Belken L. ( 1983, August 23). "What's holding the underclass down?" New York Times, p. Al.

Betten N. ( 1973). "American attitudes toward the poor: A historical overview". Current History, 65( 383), 1-5.

Billig M. ( 1973). "Normative communication in a minimal intergroup situation". European Journal of Social Psychology, 3, 339-343.

Billig M. & Tajfel H. ( 1974). "Social categorization and similarity of intergroup behavior". European Journal of Social Psychology, 3, 27-52.

Brickman P. & Bulman R. J. ( 1977). "Pleasure and pain in social comparison". In J. M. Suls & R. L. Miller (Eds.), Social comparison processes: Theoretical and empirical perspectives. New York: Halstead Press.

Brickman P. & Campbell D. T. ( 1971). "Hedonic relativism and planning the good society". In M. H. Appley (Ed.), Adaptation-level theory. New York: Academic Press.

Brinton C. C. ( 1965). The anatomy of revolution. New York: Vintage.

Cantril A. H. & Roll C. W., Jr. ( 1971). Hopes and fears of the American people. New York: Universe.

Chaiken J. M. & Chaiken M. R. ( 1982). Varieties of criminal behavior: Summary and policy implications. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

Chicago Tribune Staff. ( 1986). The American millstone: An examination of the nation's permanent underclass. Chicago: Contemporary Books.

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