1
Flying Start

Favouritism is the secret of efficiency

attr. Admiral of the Fleet
Lord Fisher

Early on 20 July 1917 General John J. Pershing, Commander-in‐ Chief American Expeditionary Force, accompanied by Colonel Harbord, his Adjutant-General, Colonel Alvord, his Chief of the General Staff, and his aide-de-camp Captain G. S. Patton Jr, left Paris and motored northward on the Route Nationale which leads to Beauvais, Montreuil and the English Channel. It was harvest time. On either side of the almost empty road stretched cornfields cultivated for over two thousand years. Tall poplars fringed the highway; age-old villages, farms and small woods dotted the landscape. This indeed seemed to be one of the loveliest and most peaceful lands in the world. Soon however the scene changed: they had reached the rear areas of the zone of the British armies. Long columns of marching men in khaki with heavy packs on their backs sweated their painful way, all in step, over the cobblestones; lorries with iron tyres and horse-drawn guns and limbered wagons threw up great clouds of dust. About noon they reached the little walled town of Montreuil which housed the British GHQ. Here they were welcomed by Lieutenant-General Fowke, the British Adjutant-General and a friend of Pershing since the days when they had both been observers with the Japanese forces in Manchuria. A very smart guard of honour from the oldest military unit in the British Army, the Honourable Artillery Company, stood ready for Pershing's inspection. After luncheon he and his party toured the headquarters and delved into the British organisation, surprised to find that it

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Patton: As Military Commander
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Patton as Military Commander *
  • Contents *
  • Maps *
  • Prologue *
  • 1 - Flying Start *
  • 2 *
  • 3 - The Foundations *
  • 4 - Morocco *
  • 5 - Tunisian Spring *
  • 6 - Sicilian Summer *
  • 7 - Regrettable Incident *
  • 8 - Birth of an Army *
  • 9 - Within the Bridgehead *
  • 10 - War on the Michelin Map *
  • 11 - The Cannae Manoeuvre/ Anglo-American Version 1944 *
  • 12 - The Wider Envelopment *
  • 13 - The Broad and the Narrow Front *
  • 14 - Lorraine *
  • 15 - Ardennes *
  • 16 - Triumph West of the Rhine *
  • 17 - Over the Rhine and beyond *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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