16
Triumph West of the Rhine

Mobilitate vigemus

(In mobility lies our strength)

Cavalry Motto

Few will quarrel with Chester Wilmot's comment soon after the war that by now Eisenhower, despite British objections and criticism from Patton and Bradley, had taken a firm grip of his command. The Germans still had 85 divisions west of the Rhine; on his past form it was virtually certain that Hitler would allow no withdrawal on their part. Eisenhower therefore decided to destroy them where they were and in the process close with the whole length of the Rhine. He would thus, with this defensive barrier in his possession, be able to forestall any counter-offensive the enemy might care to stage. Furthermore by closing with the river along the whole front he would have a choice of crossing places from which to develop his attacks in support of his main effort against the Ruhr. In particular the possibilities of an advance through Frankfurt and Kassel seemed more attractive than through the rugged country between Cologne and Bonn—a self-evident fact to every German worker on his holiday in the seventies, as he drinks his beer in the sunshine on the deck of a boat proceeding up the Rhine to Koblenz and Mainz. Accordingly, as a first step, he directed Montgomery's 21st Army Group with Ninth United States Army under command to seize the western bank of the river from Nijmegen to Düsseldorff by converging attacks, one by First Canadian Army from the Reichswald ('Veritable') and the other from the Roer river by the Ninth Army ('Grenade'). In this phase First Army was to take the Roer dams and at the same time protect the southern flank of Ninth

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Patton: As Military Commander
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Patton as Military Commander *
  • Contents *
  • Maps *
  • Prologue *
  • 1 - Flying Start *
  • 2 *
  • 3 - The Foundations *
  • 4 - Morocco *
  • 5 - Tunisian Spring *
  • 6 - Sicilian Summer *
  • 7 - Regrettable Incident *
  • 8 - Birth of an Army *
  • 9 - Within the Bridgehead *
  • 10 - War on the Michelin Map *
  • 11 - The Cannae Manoeuvre/ Anglo-American Version 1944 *
  • 12 - The Wider Envelopment *
  • 13 - The Broad and the Narrow Front *
  • 14 - Lorraine *
  • 15 - Ardennes *
  • 16 - Triumph West of the Rhine *
  • 17 - Over the Rhine and beyond *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.