Political Sociology: A Reader

By S. N. Eisenstadt | Go to book overview
41.
J. M. Roberts and G. Almond, "The Political Process in Primitive Societies," mimeographed (Stanford, California).
42.
See, in greater detail, Eisenstadt, The Political System of Empires.
43.
Talcott Parsons, "Evolutionary Universals in Society," American Sociological Review, XXIX, No. 3 (June 1964), 339-357; Robert N. Bellah, "Religious Evolution," ibid., pp. 358-374; S. N. Eisenstadt, "Social Change, Differentiation and Evolution," ibid., pp. 375-385. See also Talcott Parsons, Societies in Comparative and Evolutionary Perspectives (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1966).
44.
Ali A. Mazrui, "Edmund Burke and Reflections on the Revolution in the Congo," in S. Thrupp, ed., Comparative Studies in Society and History, V (1962-1963), 121-133.
45.
Carl G. Rosberg and William H. Friedland, eds., African Socialism (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1964).
46.
See Bendix, op. cit., as well as some of the recent discussions of the social aspects of Marx's work, such as those of George Lichtheim, Marx and the Asiatic Mode of Production, St. Anthony's Papers No. 14 (1963); Daniel Thorner, "Marx on India and the Asiatic Mode of Production," Contributions to Indian Sociology, No. 9 (December 1966), pp. 3-66, which contains a full bibliography of this controversy; F. Tokei, Sur le Mode de Production Asiatique, Studia Historica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae (Budapest ; Akadémiai Kiadó, 1966).
47.
See Talcott Parsons, "On the Concept of Political Power," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1963), pp. 236-258.
48.
Talcott Parsons, "Culture and the Social System: Introduction," in Parsons et al., Theories of Society, II (New York: The Free Press, 1965), 963-993; S. N. Eisenstadt, "Development of Sociological Thought," International Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences, XV, 23-36.
49.
From Edward A. Shils, "Charisma, Order and Status," American Sociological Review, XXX (April 1965), 199-213.
50.
Edward Shils, "Centre and Periphery," in The Logic of Personal Knowledge, essays presented to Michael Polanyi (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1961), pp. 117-131.
51.
See on this, in greater detail, S. N. Eisenstadt, ed., "On Charisma and Institution-building," introduction to the Heritage of Sociology Series (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968).
52.
Émile Durkheim, On the Division of Labour in Society (Glencoe: The Free Press, 1947), pp. 174-190.
53.
For one of the few important exceptions, see Talcott Parsons, "Some Reflections on the Place of Force in Social Process," in his Sociological Theory and Modern Society (New York: The Free Press, 1967) pp. 266-297.

INTRODUCTION
TO THE READINGS

The following selections have been chosen to represent the development of political sociology. The selections range from classical forerunners through the first modern examples and up to the most recent developments.


1
The Politics

Aristotle

In common use they define a citizen to be one who is sprung from citizens on both sides, not on the father's or the mother's only. Others carry the matter still further, and inquire how many of his ancestors have been citizens, as his grandfather, great‐ grandfather, etc., but some persons have questioned how the first of the family could prove themselves citizens, according to this popular and careless definition. Gorgias of Leontium, partly entertaining the same doubt, and partly in jest, says, that as a mortar

is made by a mortar-maker, so a citizen is made by a citizen-maker, and a Larissæan by a Larissæan‐ maker. This is indeed a very simple account of the matter; for if citizens are so, according to this definition, it will be impossible to apply it to the first founders or first inhabitants of states, who cannot possibly claim in right either of their father or mother. It is probably a matter of still more difficulty to determine their rights as citizens who are admitted to their freedom after any revolution in the state. As, for instance, at Athens, after the expulsion of the tyrants, when Clisthenes enrolled many foreigners and city-slaves amongst the tribes; and the

____________________
From The Politics of Aristotle, trans. William Allis (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1952), pp. 14-15. Reprinted by permission of the Clarendon Press.

-24-

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