Progress without Poverty: Socially Responsible Economic Growth

By Peter S. Albin | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This book developed over a number of years and reflects many influences, criticisms, and kindnesses. Institutional support was received from New York University through its Arts and Sciences Research Fund, Schools of Business Research Fund, and Institute of Labor Relations; and in the last stage, there has been a healthy spillover of ideas from work on formal characteristics of technology carried out under a grant to me from the National Science Foundation. A grant from Resources for the Future, Inc., assisted at an early stage of the research. John Jay College of the City University of New York provided support in the final stages of the work, and the University of California at Berkeley in intermediate stages. I owe a special debt to the University of Cambridge for the many courtesies extended to me over a sabbatical year and several summers in residence. Individual acknowledgments are an incomplete index of the intellectual support and renewed education that I received there. Perhaps I am a slow learner or perhaps it was the strength of my original neoclassical education, but it took some years for me to realize the power of the tradition and style of work which derive from and extend Keynes's original insights into the driving forces of capitalism. I have tried to write about how the system works and might be controlled rather than about how a system would have to work were the ideological claims made on its behalf to be realized.

Many individuals have left a mark on this book. I would like particularly to thank Tony Atkinson, Will Baumol, Alex Belinfante, Christopher Bliss, John Eatwell, Robin Marris, James Meade, Hy Minsky, Geoff Heale, David Newbury, and Joan Robinson for thoughts and criticism on the theoretical analysis along with Pat Albin, Roger Alcaly, Bennett Harrison, Carol Jusenius, Bob Mier, John Mason, and Thomas Vietorisz for guidance on matters of political economy.

The sections on poverty and public assistance reflect a long and productive collaboration with Bruno Stein, and the sections on educational policy borrow from joint work with Shirley Johnson. Finally, much material on macroeconomic policy was developed in the course of my

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Progress without Poverty: Socially Responsible Economic Growth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 229

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.