Perspectives on the Grateful Dead: Critical Writings

By Robert G. Weiner | Go to book overview

The Grateful Dead as Community

Rachel Wilgoren

In order to gain a clear perspective on the cultural impact of the Grateful Dead, it is necessary to examine the community that has risen up around them: a community of fans with its own traditions and rituals, morality/ philosophy, and support mechanisms. We must also explore the benefits offered by membership in this community in order to see why it has been so successful. Lastly, it is crucial that we examine the very nature and changing dynamic of community, so that we may evaluate the position of this subculture within American society today.

It may be helpful to start with a definition of the Grateful Dead community before looking at its origins. Rolling Stone writer Mikal Gilmore describes the Grateful Dead community:

The Dead and their audience practically form their own self-sufficient fellowship, an alternative commonwealth that boasts, among other things, its own pop press, made up of several Dead-related magazines; its own radio program, syndicated as ‘‘The Grateful Dead Hour’’ hosted by David Gans; its own computer-linked database system (in which Deadheads not only trade fans’ notes and debate ethical issues but also pass along their concerns directly to various band members); and its own worldwide network of tape collectors, who, with the band’s blessing and cooperation, record all the Dead’s performances and share them with other obsessive archivists. (Brandelius 232)

The concept of the Grateful Dead as community dates back to the mid-60s when the band and its support staff (consisting of spouses and close friends) all lived in a house at 710 Ashbury Street in San Francisco, which served as both home and band headquarters. The communal spirit of the

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on the Grateful Dead: Critical Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.