Homework: Motivation and Learning Preference

By Eunsook Hong; Roberta M. Milgram | Go to book overview

Preface

This book focuses on homework, a topic of popular interest that is not well represented in the professional literature. Both the popular and the research literature have focused on homework as viewed from the outside, that is, on the nature of the homework itself. The focus here is on homework from the inside, on the student who does the homework. The goals of this book are to (a) give counselors, teachers, and parents a theoretical understanding of homework; (b) provide them with a way to assess each student’s motivation to do homework and personal profile of home learning preferences; and (c) introduce them to methods and materials designed to facilitate their meeting the formidable challenge of helping children do their homework more effectively. Another important goal of the book is to open up a new research topic that has been almost totally neglected until now. The book consists of 10 chapters and is divided into three parts.


PART I

A conceptual model of homework performance, presented in the first chapter, is the first such model to appear in the literature. It depicts the formulation of the component concepts of the source and strength of motivation to do homework and the profile of preferences about how, when, where, and with whom homework is to be done. The theoretical model is designed to be heuristic, that is, not only to describe the phenomenon of homework, but also to serve as a catalyst for further research

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