Making Space: Merging Theory and Practice in Adult Education

By Vanessa Sheared; Peggy A. Sissel et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many individuals and institutions must be thanked for the role they played in the emergence of this book, from its conceptual stage to its completion. First, thanks to Ralph Brockett, under whose leadership the Commission of Professors of Adult Education (CPAE) formed the ad hoc committee whose mission it was to entertain proposals for this book. Next, our gratitude goes to Annie Brooks, who chaired that ad hoc committee, and to committee members Arthur Wilson, Talmadge Guy, Jorge Jeria, and Trudy Kibbe Reed, who commented on the proposed outline of the book and selected us as editors. Special thanks also goes to Carol Kasworm, who, as chair of CPAE, assisted us in ensuring the autonomy and integrity of the book, and our editorial freedom by negotiating its release from AAACE.

A note of appreciation is also extended to our respective universities, San Francisco State University (Vanessa) and the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (Peggy). As a result of several small institutional grants that were made to each of us for the purpose of developing this book, and the support given to us from each of our departments, we were able to undertake the required mailing, faxing, and phone calling that is necessary when both editors and contributors are time zones away.

Not to be overlooked in our thanks are the members of this book’s advisory board. The selection of chapters for this book was undertaken through a juried process. Upon acceptance of the prospectus by CPAE, Drs. Sheared and Sissel issued an international call for papers. Proposals were received from around the world, and were reviewed and critiqued by an advisory board of international scholars of adult education. To ensure inclusivity, we convened a group of individuals who we believe represent cross-sectional perspectives, and multiple and intersecting positions and realities. We thank you for your advice, direction,

-xv-

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