Making Space: Merging Theory and Practice in Adult Education

By Vanessa Sheared; Peggy A. Sissel et al. | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

b

Brewer, R. M. (1993). “Theorizing Race, Class, and Gender: The New Scholarship of Black Feminist Intellectuals and Black Women’s Labor.” In S. M. James and A.P.A. Busia (eds.), Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women, 13–30. New York: Routledge.

Brown, A. H. (1997). “Making the Invisible Visible by Challenging the Myth of the Universal Teacher: African American Women Post-secondary Mathematics Teachers.” Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Dissertation Abstracts International 58-06A, 2023.


c

Clark, S. P., and Blythe, L. (1962). Echo in My Soul. New York: E. P. Dutton.

Clark, S. P., and Brown, C. S. (1986). Ready from Within. Navarro, CA: Wild Trees Press.

Collins, P. H. (1991). Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment. New York: Routledge.

Courtney, S. (1989). “Defining Adult and Continuing Education.” In S. B. Merriam and P. M. Cunningham (eds.), Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education, 15–25. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.


d

Dilworth, M. E. (1990). Reading between the Lines: Teachers and Their Racial/Ethnic Cultures. Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education.


e

Etter-Lewis, G. (1993). My Soul Is My Own: Oral Narratives of African American Women in the Professions. New York: Routledge.

Etter-Lewis, G., and Foster, M. (eds.). (1996). Unrelated Kin: Race and Gender in Women’s Personal Narratives. New York: Routledge


f

Farmer, R. (1993). “Place but Not Importance: The Race for Inclusion in Academe.” In J. James and R. Farmer (eds.), Spirit, Space, and Survival: African American Women in (White) Academe, 196–217. New York: Routledge.

Fultz, M. (1995). “African American Teachers in the South, 1890–1940: Growth, Feminization, and Salary Discrimination.” Teachers College Record 96(3), 544–568.


h

Henry, A. (1993). “There Are No Safe Places: Pedagogy as Powerful and Dangerous Terrain.” Action in Teacher Education 15(4), 1–4.

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom. New York: Routledge.

Howard-Vital, M. R. (1989). “African American Women in Higher Education: Struggling to Gain Identity.” Journal of Black Studies 20(2), 180–191.


i

Irvine, J. J. (1989). “Beyond Role Models: An Examination of Cultural Influences on the Pedagogical Perspectives of Black Teachers.” Peabody Journal of Education 66(4), 51–63.


j

James, J., and Farmer, R. (eds.). (1993). Spirit, Space and Survival: African American Women in (White) Academe. New York: Routledge.

Johnson-Bailey, J. (1994). “Making a Way Out of No Way: An Analysis of the Educational Narratives of Reentry Black Women with Emphasis on Issues of Race, Gender, Class, and Color.” Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Dissertation Abstracts International 55, 2681.


k

King, D. K. (1995). “Multiple Jeopardy, Multiple Consciousness: The Context of a Black Feminist Ideology.” In B. Guy-Sheftall (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought, 294–318. New York: The New Press.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Space: Merging Theory and Practice in Adult Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 359

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.