Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education

By Rita Dunn; Shirley A. Griggs | Go to book overview

Chapter 16

Incorporating Learning Styles into the Curricula of Two Programs in a College of Health-Related Professions

Joyce A. MillerandRose F. Lefkowitz


INTRODUCTION

College professors! Hear the clarion call! Imagine, for a moment, that you are a student in your own classroom. The professor is lecturing for about two hours and you are bonded to your seat required to listen. By nature, you are a visual and tactual learner and prefer to have some hands-on experience when learning new and difficult information. You want to see some videotapes, slides, and/ or transparencies and the professor provides none. Maybe you would like to get a feel for the new material by manipulating models or touching the keyboard of a microcomputer. In this scenario, the professor is teaching, but is the student learning?

Are you aware that learning-styles-based teaching significantly improved the academic achievement and attitudes of college students (see Appendix I)? Despite a plethora of supportive research, on the college scene, acceptance of diversity among learners and the need to accommodate various styles has not been the rule. In fact, after identifying the learning styles of 109 undergraduate college students Miller, Alway, and McKinley (1987) recommended that faculty teach the students skills so that they could adopt a better learning style! That style may be choice has been negated by Restak (1991), Thies (1979), and Milgram, Dunn, and Price (1993), who argued that almost four-fifths of learning style is biological and further embedded in cultural norms. Learning-styles interventions also have been found to be effective in maintaining college enrollment (Nelson, et al., 1993) and for showing students how to study and do their homework through their style strengths (Lenehan et al., 1994).

However, in our College of Health-Related Professions, two programs,

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.