Governing Race: Policy, Process, and the Politics of Race

By Nina M. Moore | Go to book overview

Appendix D:

Sources and Methodology for Compilation of Voting Data

Data for the South for 1960 were derived from the Census Bureau’s Statistical Abstract 1980. The 1962 and 1964 data are taken from Pat Watters and Reese Cleghorn’s Climbing Jacob’s Ladder. The 1966 data are derived from the Census Bureau’s Statistical Abstract 1980 and Watters and Cleghorn’s Climbing. Actual registration numbers for 1966 were taken from the Census Bureau’s Abstract, while Voting Age Population (VAP) figures were taken from Watters and Cleghorn to generate registration rates.

Southern voter data for 1970 were derived from two sources, the 1980 Census Bureau’s Abstract (Table 849, p. 514) and the Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights, Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. Senate, Hearings on the Extension of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, 94th Congress, 1st Session (Washington, D.C.: U.S. GPO, 1975), Exhibit 18, p. 698. Actual registration numbers were taken from the Census Bureau’s Abstract, while VAP figures were taken from the subcommittee report to generate registration rates. Registration rates and voting age population data for 1970 were available only for seven of the eleven selected southern states. Voter data for the remaining four states, Arkansas, Florida, Tennessee, and Texas were derived as follows: I calculated the average percentage change in registration rates between 1966 and 1970 for the remaining seven southern states for blacks ( 3.9%) and whites ( 4.9%). I applied this rate of growth to the 1966 rate of the four missing states to estimate their 1970 registration rates. I then used this estimated registration rate and data on the number of registered voters available in the sources to estimate the number of eligible voters.

Data on the South for 1976 were taken from the 1980 Statistical Abstract. Finally, the Census Bureau’s population series on presidential elections year voting was used to obtain southern data for 1980, 1982, 1986, 1988, and 1990. See the discussion

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Governing Race: Policy, Process, and the Politics of Race
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - Process, Policy, and Issue Politics 1
  • 2 - Governing Race in the Early Years 29
  • 3 - The Peak Years of Civil Rights Legislative Reform 51
  • 4 - Race and Civil Rights Policymaking in Transition 81
  • 5 - The Contemporary Politics of Racial Policymaking 109
  • 6 - An Overview: Race, Process, and Policy 145
  • Appendix A 183
  • Appendix B 185
  • Appendix C 187
  • Appendix D 189
  • Appendix E 191
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 213
  • About the Author 217
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