The Journey to the Promised Land: The African American Struggle for Development since the Civil War

By Dione Brooks Taylor; Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

8

The Journey to the Promised Land: Summary, Conclusions, and Implications

The crowdedness in the Negro ghettos, the poverty and the economic insecurity, the lack of wholesome recreation are factors which all work in the direction of fostering anti-social tendencies leading to conflict.

Gunnar Myrdal, 1944

Racial reconciliation is a top priority in the United States of the 21st century. I am going to play a role in efforts to increase African American membership in the Republican Party.

Jack Kemp, 1997


THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY INPERSPECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to present important aspects of the struggle of African Americans for development from the end of the Civil War to the present. It is a study of their journey to the promised land. When President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, to take effect on January 1, 1863, the Civil War was already under way. During his first inaugural address on March 4, 1861, Lincoln raised the question of slavery in form of rhetorical questions, asking “May Congress prohibit slavery in the territories? The Constitution does not expressly say. Must Congress protect slavery in the territories? The Constitution does not expressly say.” 1 Lincoln’s position

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