On the Bus with Rosa Parks: Poems

By Rita Dove | Go to book overview

On the Bus with Rosa Parks

Poems

Rita Dove

W. W. Norton & Company
New York · London

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On the Bus with Rosa Parks: Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • On the Bus with Rosa Parks - Poems *
  • For Aviva for Fred *
  • Contents *
  • Cameos *
  • July, 1925 13
  • Freedom: Bird'S-Eye View *
  • Singsong 27
  • I Cut My Finger Once on Purpose 28
  • Parlor 30
  • The First Book 31
  • Maple Valley Branch Library, 1967 32
  • Freedom: Bird'S-Eye View 34
  • Testimonial 35
  • Dawn Revisited 36
  • Black on a Saturday Night *
  • My Mother Enters the Work Force 39
  • Black on a Saturday Night 40
  • The Musician Talks about "Process" 42
  • Sunday 44
  • The Camel Comes to Us from the Barbarians 46
  • The Venus of Willendorf 48
  • Incarnation in Phoenix 51
  • Revenant *
  • Best Western Motor Lodge, AAA Approved 55
  • Revenant 56
  • On Veronica 57
  • There Came a Soul 58
  • The Peach Orchard 60
  • Against Repose 62
  • Against Self-Pity 63
  • GöTterdäMmerung 64
  • Ghost Walk 66
  • Lady Freedom among Us 69
  • For Sophie, Who'll Be in First Grade in the Year 2000 71
  • On the Bus with Rosa Parks - All History Is a Negotiation between Familiarity and Strangeness *
  • Sit Back, Relax 75
  • The Situation Is Intolerable 76
  • Freedom Ride 77
  • Climbing in 78
  • Claudette Colvin Goes to Work 79
  • The Enactment 81
  • Rosa 83
  • Qe2. Transatlantic Crossing. Third Day 84
  • In the Lobby of the Warner Theatre, Washington, D.C 86
  • The Pond, Porch-View: Six P.M., Early Spring 88
  • Notes and Acknowledgments *
  • Notes 91
  • Acknowledgments 93
  • About the Author 95
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