The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence

By Anthony Read; David Fisher | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank our many friends in India, Pakistan and Britain who have helped and advised us during the writing of this book, particularly the following: Patwant Singh, Delhi-born Delhi-phile, bon viveur and good friend, who wined and dined us and opened many doors; Meher Wilshaw; Kushwant Singh, the Doctor Johnson of Delhi, who is talented enough to be his own Boswell, and his wife, who encouraged us and told us jokes; Rear Admiral (Rtd) Krishna Nayyar, Mountbatten's token Indian, who regaled us with stories of the great man; Dr Freddie Mehta, Tata's man in Bombay, who helped us with introductions and advice, and who did his best to explain Indian economics to us; our old friend Maneck Dalal, Tata's man in London, who gave us the benefit of his guidance and immense experience from the outset of this enterprise; Syed Wajid Ali and Mian Mumtaz Muhammad Khan Daultana, both of whom remembered Jinnah not as an austere politician but as a warm and often jolly family friend; Mr Neil O'Brian, who put the case for the Anglo-Indian community most forcefully; Joya Chatterjee, who trekked across Delhi to lend us a copy of her excellent PhD thesis; Professor Ravinder Kumar, director of the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, New Delhi; Dr S.H.M. Jafri and Dr Mohammad Ali Siddiqui, of the Pakistan Study Centre, University of Karachi, for their help and guidance; Niyatee Shinde and, as always, Vijay Nesargi, for much advice, many contacts, and for arranging a much-appreciated temporary membership of the Cricket Club of India, Bombay; Qutubuddin Aziz, passionate advocate of Pakistan and loyal defender of the late General Zia-ul-Haq; Rear Admiral (Rtd) Satyindra Singh, an unlikely Sikh sea‐ dog who writes English comic verse and has one of the shrewdest strategic brains we have met; Gorbachan Singh, diplomat and knowledgeable commentator on world affairs; Judge Narula, whose cold, clear eye on the people he met illuminated for us such diverse characters as Gandhi and Zulfikar Ali Bhutto; Balbir Singh Grewal, for his memories of the Mountbattens and the period of partition; Professor David Taylor of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University; Mark Tully and Gillian Wright for their courtesy and help; Barun De and H. M. Seervhai, historians extraordinary.

For giving us their time, memories, advice and hospitality, we also thank:

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 565

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.