The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence

By Anthony Read; David Fisher | Go to book overview

21
'Leave India to God — or to Anarchy'

The failure of the Cripps mission was a turning-point for many in India. Most Congressmen, and certainly Azad, were bemused by Cripps's sudden departure: knowing nothing of the telegrams flying to and from London, they had assumed that the talks so far had been the normal limbering up for the start of serious negotiations. The result was serious disillusionment, particularly when Cripps broadcast a farewell message putting all the blame for the breakdown on Congress. The Congress newspapers, which had treated the declaration as a fair basis for negotiation while talks were still in progress, suddenly changed their tune. Taking their lead from Gandhi's Harijan, they now denounced it as an affront to the country, an insult to Indian intelligence and final proof of Britain's naked imperialism. 1

Britain's stock was sinking fast, with an increasing number of Indians believing she could not win the war in the east — and who could blame them, as disaster followed disaster during the whole of April. Along with the continuing reverses in Burma, powerful Japanese naval forces moved into the Indian Ocean at the beginning of the month. On Easter Sunday, carrier-based aircraft attacked Colombo, the capital and chief port of Ceylon, causing considerable damage and sinking six British ships, including three warships and a submarine depot ship, in less than an hour. Shortly afterwards, Japanese aircraft spotted two British cruisers, the Devonshire and the Cornwall, and sank them both with terrifyingly accurate dive‐ bombing.

A second Japanese naval force appeared in the Bay of Bengal the following day. Fifty-five merchant ships in east-coast Indian ports were ordered to sea, but within a few hours 20 of them were at the bottom of the ocean, while Japanese submarines went into action in neighbouring waters to bring the total tonnage sunk that day to a staggering 92,000. The Japanese then bombed the Indian ports of Vizagapatam and Kakindada, which lie between Calcutta and Madras. As these

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Proudest Day - India's Long Road to Independence *
  • Contents *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Glossary *
  • Maps *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Prologue *
  • 1 - In Quiet Trade *
  • 2 *
  • 3 *
  • 4 *
  • 5 *
  • 6 *
  • 7 *
  • 8 *
  • 9 *
  • 10 *
  • 11 *
  • 12 *
  • 13 *
  • 14 *
  • 15 *
  • 16 *
  • 17 *
  • 18 *
  • 19 *
  • 20 *
  • 21 *
  • 22 *
  • 23 *
  • 24 *
  • 25 *
  • 26 *
  • 27 *
  • 28 *
  • 29 *
  • 30 *
  • Epilogue *
  • Source Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 565

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.