The Human Cost of a Management Failure: Organizational Downsizing at General Hospital

By Seth Allcorn; Howell S.Baum et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

The Third Set of Interviews

VAL KASMAN, JULY 20, 1994

I’m still a Manager III. I’m responsible for a number of ancillary departments, clinical services, and program development. I still report to Jacob. I have about a dozen departments that report to me and around 800 employees. I’ve just added a number of departments.

I imagine that the scope of my role will expand to cover responsibilities for the matching ambulatory programs for my inpatient services. If you want to really know, I’ve had absolutely no communication about this issue, which is frustrating. It ticks me off about being involved in the change process. The SPC committees are an exercise in tolerance. There is no information or meaningful involvement.

If we are flattened, I think some who report to me will be laid off. I may lose some administrators. I don’t know how it will affect Jacob.

Nothing has been implemented. There is only extreme anxiety, frustration, anger, distrustfulness, and negative attitudes. Two people are being constantly blamed, Maggiano and Lewin. People believe that they don’t know what they are doing. They are letting SPC run over the organization.

I feel that our ethical foundation is eroding. People who speak out are told to be quiet. Those who seem to be responding positively are those who are quiet and passive. They are doing and saying what they are told. Speaking out for me is becoming a disservice to me. Independent thoughts are dangerous. You don’t question the establishment. Everyone and the physicians see that they aren’t playing a role. We know what to do, but our voice isn’t being heard. Be quiet or else. I’m not intimidated, but I’m getting very angry about it. I’ll do my best even if no one appreciates it. I guess I might take that other ticket and leave.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Human Cost of a Management Failure: Organizational Downsizing at General Hospital
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.