Tony Hillerman: A Critical Companion

By John M. Reilly | Go to book overview
Save to active project

12

Sacred Clowns
(1993)

In the three years that passed between the account of Leaphorn and Chee working on the Ashie Pinto case in Coyote Waits (1990) and the reappearance of the detectives in Sacred Clowns (1993), Tony Hillerman made some interesting changes in his fictional project. In the first of the changes, he has assigned Chee to work with Leaphorn in the Special Investigations Office of the Navajo Tribal Police (7–8). For all we know, Hillerman may have discovered that the specialization in law enforcement characteristic of larger police forces has influenced the organization of the Law and Order Division of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Then, again, perhaps he took the model for the special office from crime fiction itself, where detectives are commonly assigned to the homicide squad, the vice squad, and so on. Regardless of how he came up with the idea, Hillerman’s creation of the new two-man unit for the Navajo Tribal Police underscores the premise of Sacred Clowns as a police procedural narrative. In previous novels, the detectives evidently took up particular cases because the crimes occurred near their regional offices, or because Captain Largo assigned the cases. Now, however, a special unit seems to be justified for particularly challenging cases, and, naturally, the crack detectives on the force are to be given those puzzles requiring their exceptional skill in detective investigation.

The creation of a unique Special Investigations Office demands cooperation and a degree of intimacy between Leaphorn and Chee that the

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tony Hillerman: A Critical Companion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 221

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.