Anne Rice: A Critical Companion

By Jennifer Smith | Go to book overview

7

Memnoch the Devil
(1995)

A year after his adventures as a human being in The Tale of the Body Thief, Lestat the vampire is in New York stalking a new victim, Roger, a drug dealer and vicious murderer who is also a great collector of religious art and the father of one of the few truly good humans Lestat has ever encountered, Dora Flynn. Lestat plans to kill Roger but not until Roger has said good-bye to Dora, who is returning to New Orleans where she has her own religious cable TV show. Roger deserves to die, but Lestat has no wish to cause Dora any suffering at all because he has come to love her for her goodness and her belief.

In the back of his mind he has another problem: something’s stalking him. He’s had the feeling for months, something dark behind him, watching him, waiting for him, something like the Devil. Shrugging off the thought, Lestat kills Roger and then dismembers him, scattering his body parts throughout New York. But when he goes into a bar to rest, Roger sits down beside him, the first of his victims ever to return as a ghost. Roger holds Lestat spellbound as he tells him the story of his life and entrusts his daughter into Lestat’s hands. His only regret is that he never found Dora the Veil of Veronica, the woman who wiped Christ’s face on the way to the cross and thereby imprinted His picture on the cloth. While Lestat is still dealing with this, Roger fades away into death, and Lestat encounters the next being who wants to tell him a story, his supernatural stalker, Memnoch the Devil, come out of Hell to recruit

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anne Rice: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • 1 - The Life of Anne Rice 1
  • 2 - Supernatural Genres: Horror, Gothic, and Fantasy 9
  • 3 - (1976) 21
  • 4 - (1985) 43
  • 5 - (1988) 63
  • 6 - (1992) 83
  • 7 - (1995) 99
  • 8 - (1989) 115
  • 9 - (1990) 133
  • 10 - (1993) 151
  • 11 - (1994) 159
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 187
  • About the Author 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 195

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.