Anne Rice: A Critical Companion

By Jennifer Smith | Go to book overview

8

The Mummy or Ramses the Damned
(1989)

Anne Rice has always been candid about her love for horror movies, especially mummy movies. One of the dedications for The Mummy is to her father, ‘‘who came more than once to get me from the neighborhood show, when ‘the mummy’ had scared me so badly that I couldn’t even stay in the lobby with the creepy music coming through the doors.’’ In 1988, she wrote a screenplay for her own mummy movie only to find that Hollywood wanted to mangle her story. She refused the revisions and instead turned the screenplay into an action-adventure book that pays homage to all the clichés of the mummy movies and then adds twists and turns that make it a Rice original.

The Mummy begins in Egypt when an archaeologist opens the tomb of Ramses the Damned and awakens him from his immortal sleep by accident. While Ramses is stirring, the archaeologist’s villainous nephew, Henry, comes in and poisons the archaeologist. Ramses is shipped back to England as part of the archaeologist’s great find and awakens in time to prevent the archaeologist’s daughter, Julie, from also being murdered by Henry. Julie falls in love with Ramses and follows him throughout London as he learns the modern world. Then she takes him to Cairo, along with her ex-fiancé and his father and the archaeologist’s assistant and the ever-present Henry. Once back in his native land, Ramses makes the mistake of using the elixir of immortality to rejuvenate the mummy of his long dead lover, Cleopatra, creating a mindless monster that be-

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Anne Rice: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • 1 - The Life of Anne Rice 1
  • 2 - Supernatural Genres: Horror, Gothic, and Fantasy 9
  • 3 - (1976) 21
  • 4 - (1985) 43
  • 5 - (1988) 63
  • 6 - (1992) 83
  • 7 - (1995) 99
  • 8 - (1989) 115
  • 9 - (1990) 133
  • 10 - (1993) 151
  • 11 - (1994) 159
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 187
  • About the Author 195
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