Terrorism, Asymmetric Warfare, and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Defending the U.S. Homeland

By Anthony H. Cordesman | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

Federal Efforts by Department and Agency

Any outside effort to characterize federal efforts by department and agency faces formidable problems, particularly at a time when the Bush Administration is reexamining every aspect of the Clinton Administration and is making changes of its own in reaction to the events of September 2001. Federal departments and agencies generally do a poor job in providing unclassified reporting on any aspect of their counterterrorism programs. Many fail to provide the details of their activities. Of those who do report, many discuss the threat but only provide a vague description of their actual programs and no detailed description of the money being spent. No agency provides a meaningful description of its future program, future costs, milestones, or measures of effectiveness. The level of cooperation with state and local agencies is rarely described, and when it is, the discussion tends to be discussed in anecdotal terms on terms of meaningless measures of effort, like numbers of undefined exercises, training sessions, and so on.

Research and development programs receive little detailed description. The description that is provided often concentrates on the threat being dealt with, and agencies provide little program detail. There is no evidence that any department or agency has provided a technology net assessment to examine whether its programs will provide defensive capabilities that outpace advances in offensive capability. There is virtually no discussion of the risk posed by countermeasures or the cost to defeat current and planned programs. There is no discussion of the outyear costs of research and development activity or of estimated deployment schedules, measures of effectiveness, and life cycle costs. Almost without exception, there is no way

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