The Food Safety Information Handbook

By Cynthia A. Roberts | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Food safety is both a solid issue and an enigmatic one. Ask anyone on the street for a definition, and they’ll probably answer that it means food that is safe to eat. But breaking this down into its components is a harder task. If one asks important questions such as what is safe food, how safe is safe, how many people get sick from unsafe food, what are the major causes of unsafe food, how can food be made safe, and who’s responsibility is food safety, the seemingly solid nature of the discipline dissolves.

While this book cannot pretend to answer questions that even experts in the field are grappling with, it does try to give the reader some possible answers, a broad overview of the subject, and the tools necessary to interpret the quality of the food they eat and the validity of the information to which they are exposed. The audience for the book includes those who eat food, whether they be parents, students, cooks, food industry workers, dietitians, health professionals, educators, or librarians.

The first part of the book offers an introduction and overview to the field of food safety. Chapter 1 begins with food hazards, exposing the reader to information about viruses, pathogenic bacteria, naturally occurring toxins, pesticides, and other dangers. Although humankind has been working to protect the food supply for millennia, pathogens and other forces have been similarly changing throughout the millennia to thwart attempts to make the food supply safe. These factors are examined, followed by a short history of discoveries that have contributed to the current state of scientific knowledge about food safety. Finally, readers are introduced to some of the techniques that have been developed to make food safer, the result of which can be seen in the aisles of grocery stores.

In Chapter 2 the reader is introduced to several hot topics and the issues on each side of the debate over food biotechnology, bovine somatotropin, food irradiation, pesticides, drinking water quality, and restaurant food safety. Chapter 3 provides a chronology of events covered under the umbrella of food safety—inventions, discoveries, foodborne illness outbreaks, legislation, and other events that have shaped our understanding of the safety of food. Chapter 4 traces the evolution of the laws

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Food Safety Information Handbook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 313

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.