The Food Safety Information Handbook

By Cynthia A. Roberts | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6

CAREERS IN FOOD SAFETY

There is no one path to a career in food safety, mainly because food safety is a part of so many jobs. Being a researcher requires a high level of education with extensive knowledge of science, while managing a restaurant requires much less education and not necessarily a background in science. This chapter outlines some of the job possibilities and makes general recommendations on how the reader should prepare for them. While no schools currently offer a degree in food safety, a number of credentials do exist. All food safety credentials for food professionals existing at the time of publication are outlined:

Certified Food Safety Professional (CFSP)

Registered Environmental Health Specialist/Registered Sanitarian (REHS/RS)

Certified Food Protection Professional (CFPP)

National Certified Professional Food Manager (NCPFM)

Food Safety Manager Certificate (FSMC)

National Restaurant Association ServSafe

Recommendations for finding continuing education (CE) courses and distance

learning courses in food safety are given. The chapter closes with ideas on where to

find scholarships, internships, and fellowship opportunities.

Food safety is a broad field, with widely varying jobs requiring various levels of education. Researchers from academia, industry, and government work to develop and assess new technologies, unravel disease mechanisms of foodborne pathogens, and control microorganisms causing foodborne illness from the farm to the table, all to ensure that the food we eat is safe and wholesome. Food processing is the largest manufacturing industry in the United States. Many food protection specialists are needed to ensure that food is produced safely. Finally, while most consumers do not see much of the research and manufacturing aspects of food, we all have experience with the retail food service industry—restaurants, grocery stores, convenience

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