The Future of Corporate Globalization: From the Extended Order to the Global Village

By Jeremiah J. Sullivan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2

POINTING THE WAY: 1900 TO 2100

Where are we going? What dramas will we witness and be a part of? One could answer questions like these by consulting social science theories, but they have little to say about the long run of 100 years. Experts are available, but often they contradict each other or are blatantly self-serving. Why not consult the older generation? I asked my mother, born in 1908, what was the most dramatic event in her life. She thought for a moment, then said,

It was when the Fourteenth Regiment from Brooklyn came home from the war [in 1919]. All the men from the neighborhood were in the regiment, and they all marched through Brooklyn to their armory. We were in the crowd on the sidewalk and we looked and looked for my brother Don, but he wasn’t there. My mother was shocked and didn’t know who to ask. Later we heard he was left behind to guard Germans.

Sheer terror and, happily for most Americans, relief from terror were hallmarks of the 20th century. No wonder it was sometimes called the “age of anxiety.” By consulting the feelings and stories of individuals, we get a grounded sense of what mattered and what will matter. Twenty-first-century globalized Americans will want relief from anxiety, authenticity rather than anonymity, and a sense of the coherence of things rather than fragmentation. How do we know that? Because the storytellers and thinkers of 1900 and thereabouts have told us so.


ILLUSION, BETRAYAL, AND DISORDER

In 1900, the average person had less than one-fifth of the purchasing power of the average person in 2002, due in part to goods prices five times

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Future of Corporate Globalization: From the Extended Order to the Global Village
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.