The Unraveling of Island Asia? Governmental, Communal, and Regional Instability

By Bruce Vaughn | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
A detailed survey of these proposed changes was provided by the World Economic Outlook (Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund, 1991). See, especially, pp. 26–37.
2.
Richard Latter, Terrorism in the 1990s, Wilton Park Papers No. 44 (London: HMSO, November 1991), p. 2.
3.
David Abshire, “US Foreign Policy in the Post–Cold War Era: The Need for an Agile Strategy,” The Washington Quarterly 19.2 (Spring 1996): 42–44: Simon Dalby, “Security, Intelligence, the National Interest and the Global Environment,” Intelligence and National Security 10.4 (October 1995): 186; and Gwyn Prins, “Politics and the Environment,” International Affairs 66.4 (October 1990): 711–30.
4.
Amitav Acharaya, A New Regional Order in Southeast Asia: ASEAN in the Post Cold War Era, Adelphi Papers No. 279 (London: International Institute of Strategic Studies, 1993), p. 12.
5.
Peter Chalk, Grey Area Phenomena in Southeast Asia (Canberra: Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, 1997), pp. 6–7, 15–16.
6.
Piracy here is defined as any act of boarding any vessel with the intent to commit crime and with the capability to use force in furtherance of the act. The definition is wider than the delineation adopted by the United Nations, which restricts itself to illicit acts on the high seas only. This is problematic as most acts of maritime violence take place in territorial waters or against ships already at port.
7.
Edward Fursdon, “Sea Piracy—or Maritime Mugging?” INTERSEC 5.5 (May 1995): 166; Stanley Weeks, “Law and Order at Sea: Pacific Cooperation in Dealing with Piracy, Drugs and Illegal Immigration,” in Sam Bateman and Stephen Bates, eds., Calming the Waters: Initiatives for Asia-Pacific Maritime Cooperation (Canberra: Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, 1996), p. 44.
8.
Fursdon, “Sea Piracy—or Maritime Mugging?” p. 166.
9.
See Robert Redmond, “Phantom Ships in the Far East,” INTERSEC 6.5 (May 1996): 168–69; Michael Pugh, “Piracy and Armed Robbery at Sea,” Low Intensity Conflict and Law Enforcement 2.1 (1993): 9; and “Phantom Vessels the Latest Tactic in Asian Piracy,” South China Morning Post, 21 July 1994.
10.
Fursdon, “Sea Piracy—or Maritime Mugging?” p. 166.
11.
IMB, Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships: Annual Report, 1999 (London: International Chamber of Commerce, January 2000), p. 3.
12.
Personal correspondence between author and Eric Ellen, IMB, London, January 1997. See also “Piracy Becomes World Threat,” Sunday Telegraph, 25 May 1997; and “Piracy Reports Seen as a Waste of Time,” South China Morning Post, 12 May 1993.
13.
Personal correspondence between author and John Martin, Regional Piracy Centre, Kuala Lumpur, April 1997.
14.
Personal correspondence between author and IMB officials, London and Kuala Lumpur, 1997–1999. See also IMB, Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships: A Special Report (London: International Chamber of Commerce, 1997), pp. 4–5.

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