Student Companion to Zora Neale Hurston

By Josie P. Campbell | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

This series has been designed to meet the needs of students and general readers for accessible literary criticism on the American and world writers most frequently studied and read in the secondary school, community college, and four-year college classrooms. Unlike other works of literary criticism that are written for the specialist and graduate student, or that feature a variety of reprinted scholarly essays on sometimes obscure aspects of the writer’s work, the Student Companions to Classic Writers series is carefully crafted to examine each writer’s major works fully and in a systematic way, at the level of the nonspecialist and general reader. The objective is to enable the reader to gain a deeper understanding of the work and to apply critical thinking skills to the act of reading. The proven format for the volumes in this series was developed by an advisory board of teachers and librarians for a successful series published by Greenwood Press, Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Responding to their request for easy-to-use and yet challenging literary criticism for students and adult library patrons, Greenwood Press developed a systematic format that is not intimidating but helps the reader to develop the ability to analyze literature.

How does this work? Each volume in the Student Companions to Classic Writers series is written by a subject specialist, an academic who understands students’ needs for basic and yet challenging examination of the writer’s canon. Each volume begins with a biographical chapter, drawn from published sources, biographies, and autobiographies, that relates the writer’s life to his or

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Student Companion to Zora Neale Hurston
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - The Life of Zora Neale Hurston 1
  • 2 - Zora Neale Hurston’s Fiction: an Overview 11
  • 3 - The Short Fiction 21
  • 4 - Jonah’s Gourd Vine (1934) 37
  • 5 - Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) 59
  • 6 - Moses, Man of the Mountain (1939) 79
  • 7 - Dust Tracks on a Road (1942) 101
  • 8 - Seraph on the Suwanee (1948) 119
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 157
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