Student Companion to Zora Neale Hurston

By Josie P. Campbell | Go to book overview

1

The Life of Zora Neale Hurston

Although there seems to be a great deal of information about Zora Neale Hurston’s life, sifting through it remains a challenge. In her autobiography, Dust Tracks on a Road (1942), Hurston is coyly vague about her own birth date. She claims to have “heard” that she was born in January in Eatonville, Florida, but she is also careful not to be precise about the year. Indeed, Hurston, who admits in Dust Tracks that she is a word-changer, manipulates personal dates, events, and places throughout her life. The important fact, however, is that Zora Hurston was born between 1891 and 1903—she refers to various dates during this time span—in Notasulga, Alabama, where her father grew up—not in Eatonville, as she claimed (Lowe 98). Her parents were John Hurston and Lucy Ann Potts. Lucy Potts (1865–1904) was the dark daughter of a relatively well-off landowner; she became a country schoolteacher before becoming the wife of John Hurston. John (1861–1917) was a mulatto, the son of a black woman and a white man, probably her owner. He was an itinerant carpenter, a Baptist preacher, and eventually the mayor of Eatonville. He also became the moderator of the South Florida Baptist Association. Zora was the sixth of eight children. They lived in a large house, with plenty to eat from their large garden. Zora and her siblings apparently had a happy childhood, at least until their mother died in 1904.

Not only was their home life nurturing, but so too was the town of Eatonville, a “Negro” town, run by Blacks—mayor, town council, and other municipal officers. It was the first Negro town to be incorporated and the first to

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Student Companion to Zora Neale Hurston
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - The Life of Zora Neale Hurston 1
  • 2 - Zora Neale Hurston’s Fiction: an Overview 11
  • 3 - The Short Fiction 21
  • 4 - Jonah’s Gourd Vine (1934) 37
  • 5 - Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) 59
  • 6 - Moses, Man of the Mountain (1939) 79
  • 7 - Dust Tracks on a Road (1942) 101
  • 8 - Seraph on the Suwanee (1948) 119
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 157
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 159

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.