Garrison Keillor: A Critical Companion

By Marcia Songer | Go to book overview

1

The Life of Garrison Keillor

The man the world of public radio knows as Garrison Keillor was born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942, in Anoka, Minnesota. He was the third of six children born to John Philip and Grace Ruth Denham Keillor. John Keillor was a railway mail clerk who augmented his income by doing carpentry. When Gary was five years old, his father purchased property in Brooklyn Park, eight miles from Anoka, and used his carpentry skills to build a house for his growing family. It was in this house that Gary lived until he left for college. Brooklyn Park, like Anoka, is a suburb of Minneapolis today, but it retained rural aspects while he was growing up there. He has fond memories of playing in the nearby fields and streams (Fedo 10).

Other childhood memories are not all pleasant. He was gangly while growing to his adult height of six feet four inches. When he was in the seventh grade, he saw an older boy imitate the loping way in which he walked and was mortified by such mockery (Halvorsen 8B). Gary’s understandable embarrassment was intensified by his natural shyness. As an adult, he would be able to joke about that shyness, but as an adolescent, he felt only agony.

His parents belonged to a fundamentalist sect called the Plymouth Brethren. They met in homes and eventually joined a group that gathered in Minneapolis, half an hour away. As with many such groups, the Brethren spent less time emphasizing the fundamentals of their religion

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Garrison Keillor: A Critical Companion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 163

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.