Religious Studies in Atlantic Canada: A State-Of-The-Art Review

By Paul W. R. Bowlby; Tom Faulkner | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Notes
1
Stephen C. Crites, scribe The Religion Major: A Report/The American Academy of Religion Task Force for the American Association of Colleges, (Atlanta: American Academy of Religion, 1990), 7.
2
Department of Religious Studies Self Study, 1989.
3
Ibid.
4
Universities founded by churches or religious orders that are now governed by independent Boards of Governors are, from the point of view of government funding, treated as public universities in Nova Scotia and NewBrunswick.
5
“Mi'Kmaq is actually the correct spelling, but over the years, Micmac has become the more commonly used name. Other variations are Míqmaq, Míkmaq, and Mi'mkaq. Their name comes from a word from their own language meaning ‘allies.’ Other names used for Micmac were: Cape Sable Indians, Gaspesian (Gaspesien, Micmac of Gaspé), Matueswiskitchinuuk (Malecite ‘Porcupine Indians’), Shonack (Beothuk ‘Bad Indians’), Souriquois (French), and Tarrateen (British).” http://www.dickshovel.com/mic.html, date 15 December 1999.
6
Mount Saint Vincent University Calendar, 1992–93, 9.
7
Departmental study, 1989.
8
Ibid.
9
Ibid.
10
Ibid.
11
Ibid.
12
Dalhousie University's Department of Comparative Religion declined to participate in the discussions and the resultant agreement to cooperate. The department argued, among other things, that its hierarchically structured program and commitment to provide courses for the Dalhousie international development studies programme precluded admitting more students to its courses.
13
The Framework of the MetroHalifax Universities' Business Plan,(1995): 3–4.
14
“Rationale for the change of the name of ‘Department of Theology’ to that of “Department of Religious Studies,” 18April, 1994.
15
Ibid.
16
Ibid., 2.
17
St. Francis Xavier University Academic Calendar,“Introduction,” v.
18
“Rationale for change of name.”
19
Ray Hart, “Religious and Theological Studies in American Higher Education: A Pilot Study,” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 59/4 (1991): 715–827.
20
Cited in MacDonald, “Rationale for Change of Name,”
21
In January 2000, Margaret MacDonald, Chair of Religious Studies, informed me that the university had refused to allow the replacement of the world religions specialist in the department who had taken early retirement in 1999. Rather, the university created a two-thirds position in Catholic Studies and left one-third to religious studies. The prospective appointee must teach an introductory course on world religions for religious studies.
22
St. Thomas University Calendar, 1998–99, 2.
23
Ibid., 2.
24
Memo from Dr.Thomas Parkhill to Roger Barnsley, 8 November, 1993, 1.
25
Ibid.

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religious Studies in Atlantic Canada: A State-Of-The-Art Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?