The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia

By Maurine H. Beasley; Holly C. Shulman et al. | Go to book overview

D

DEATH OF ELEANOR ROOSEVELT. Tributes to Eleanor Roosevelt came from around the world after her death from anemia and tuberculosis at the age of seventy-eight on 7 November 1962 in New York City. President John F. Kennedy* called her “one of the great ladies in the history of this country” (New York Times, 8 November 1962). Acting secretary-general U Thant of the United Nations* said, “She was truly the first lady of the world.” In a message to her family, Indian prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru* wrote, “No woman of this generation and few in the annals of history have so well understood and articulated the yearnings of men and women for social justice.” A message from Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev said, “After the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt,* Eleanor Roosevelt remained true to his convictions about the necessity for good relations between the Soviet Union and the United States in the necessity of strengthening peace in the world.” Queen Elizabeth of England noted, “The British people held her in deep respect and affection and mourn her passing” (New York Times, 9 November 1962).

At a special memorial service on 9 November 1962 at the United Nations, where ER had served as a U.S. delegate from 1946 to 1953, diplomats from 110 countries stood for a one-minute silent tribute. Then they heard a eulogy given by U.S. ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson,* who said, “She would rather light candles than curse the darkness, and her glow [has] warmed the world” (Associated Press and United Press International dispatches, New York, 9 November 1962).

President Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, and former presidents Harry S Truman* and Dwight D. Eisenhower* attended her funeral service on 10 November 1962 in St. James Episcopal Church in Hyde Park,* New York. First Lady Jackie Kennedy, former First Lady Bess Truman, and Lady Bird Johnson also were present. ER was buried

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The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Charts ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Chronology of Eleanor Roosevelt’s Life and Career xxiii
  • Well-Known Quotations by Eleanor Roosevelt xxvii
  • A 1
  • B 44
  • C 75
  • D 122
  • E 152
  • F 166
  • G 204
  • H 222
  • I 267
  • J 278
  • K 287
  • L 294
  • M 323
  • N 359
  • O 383
  • P 396
  • R 425
  • S 474
  • T 509
  • U 531
  • V 542
  • W 549
  • Y 591
  • Z 596
  • Index 599
  • Editors 618
  • Contributors 619
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