Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin | Go to book overview

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY
OF
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN


CHAPTER I

I HAVE ever had a pleasure in obtaining any little anecdotes of my ancestors. You may remember the inquiries I made among the remains of my relations when you were with me in England, and the journey I undertook for that purpose. Imagining it may be equally agreeable to you to learn the circumstances of my life, many of which you are unacquainted with, and expecting the enjoyment of a few weeks' uninterrupted leisure, I sit down to write them. Besides, there are some other inducements that excite me to this undertaking. From the poverty and obscurity in which I was born and in which I passed my earliest years, I have raised myself to a state of affluence and some degree of celebrity in the world. As constant good fortune has accompanied me even to an advanced period of life, my posterity will perhaps be desirous of learning the means which I employed, and which, thanks to Providence, so well succeeded with me. They may also deem them fit to be imitated, should any of them find themselves in similar circumstances.

This good fortune, when I reflect on it (which is frequently

-1-

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Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Macmillan's Pocket American and English Classics *
  • Macmillan's Pocket American and English Classics *
  • Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin - With Introduction and Notes *
  • Introduction v
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 21
  • Chapter III 41
  • Chapter IV 53
  • Chapter V 62
  • Chapter IV 74
  • Chapter VII 90
  • Chapter VIII 103
  • Chapter IX 117
  • Chapter X 131
  • Chapter XI 146
  • Chapter XII 159
  • Poor Richard's Almanac and Other Papers *
  • Poor Richard's Almanac 175
  • Plan for Saving One Hundred Thousand Pounds 185
  • Necessary Hints to Those That Would Be Rich 187
  • Advice to a Young Tradesman 188
  • Digging for Hidden Treasure 190
  • Remarks concerning the Savages of North America 195
  • A Petition of the Left Hand 202
  • The Whistle 203
  • Dialogue between Franklin and the Gout 205
  • The Art of Procuring Pleasant Dreams 212
  • The Ephemera: An Emblem of Human Life 217
  • To Miss Georgiana Shipley 219
  • Familiar Letters 221
  • Notes 245
  • Macmillan's - Pocket Series of English Classics *
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