Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin | Go to book overview

said one of them; "you surely don't suppose that the fort will not be taken ?" " I don't know that it will not be taken, but I know that the events of war are subject to great uncertainty." I gave them the reasons of my doubting ; the subscription was dropped, and the projectors thereby missed the mortification they would have undergone if the firework had been prepared. Dr. Bond, on some other occasion afterward, said that he did not like Franklin's forebodings.


CHAPTER XI

GOVERNOR MORRIS, who had continually worried the Assembly with message after message before the defeat of Braddock, to beat them into the making of acts to raise money for the defense of the province without taxing among others the proprietary estates, and had rejected all their bills for not having such an exempting clause, now redoubled his attacks with more hope of success, the danger and necessity being greater. The Assembly, however, continued firm, believing they had justice on their side, and that it would be giving up an essential right if they suffered the governor to amend their money bills. In one of the last, indeed, which was for granting fifty thousand pounds, his proposed amendment was only of a single word. The bill expressed that "all estates real and personal were to be taxed; those of the proprietaries not excepted." His amendment was: for not, read only. A small but very material alteration. However, when the news of the disaster reached England, our friends there, whom we had taken care to furnish with all the Assembly's answers to the governor's messages, raised a clamor against the proprietaries for their meanness and injustice in giving their governor such instructions ; some going

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Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Macmillan's Pocket American and English Classics *
  • Macmillan's Pocket American and English Classics *
  • Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin - With Introduction and Notes *
  • Introduction v
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 21
  • Chapter III 41
  • Chapter IV 53
  • Chapter V 62
  • Chapter IV 74
  • Chapter VII 90
  • Chapter VIII 103
  • Chapter IX 117
  • Chapter X 131
  • Chapter XI 146
  • Chapter XII 159
  • Poor Richard's Almanac and Other Papers *
  • Poor Richard's Almanac 175
  • Plan for Saving One Hundred Thousand Pounds 185
  • Necessary Hints to Those That Would Be Rich 187
  • Advice to a Young Tradesman 188
  • Digging for Hidden Treasure 190
  • Remarks concerning the Savages of North America 195
  • A Petition of the Left Hand 202
  • The Whistle 203
  • Dialogue between Franklin and the Gout 205
  • The Art of Procuring Pleasant Dreams 212
  • The Ephemera: An Emblem of Human Life 217
  • To Miss Georgiana Shipley 219
  • Familiar Letters 221
  • Notes 245
  • Macmillan's - Pocket Series of English Classics *
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