Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Benjamin Franklin | Go to book overview
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Dr. Wright, an English physician, when at'Paris, wrote to a friend, who was one of the Royal Society, an account of the high esteem my experiments were in among the learned abroad, and of their wonder that my writings had been so little noticed in England. The society on this resumed the consideration of the letters that had been read to them, and the celebrated Dr. Watson drew up a summary account of them and of all I had afterward sent to England on the subject, which he accompanied with some praise of the writer. This summary was then printed in their " Transactions;" and some members of the society in London, particularly the very ingenious Mr. Canton, having verified the experiment of procuring lightning from the clouds by a pointed rod and acquainted them with the success, they soon made me more than amends for the slight with which they had before treated me. Without my having made any application for that honor they chose me a member, and voted that I should be excused the customary payments, which would have amounted to twenty-five guineas ; and ever since have given me their " Transactions " gratis. They also presented me with the gold medal of Sir Godfrey Copley for the year 1753, the delivery of which was accompanied by a very handsome speech of the president, Lord Macclesfield, wherein I was highly honored.


CHAPTER XII

OUR new governor, Captain Denny, brought over for me the before-mentioned medal from the Royal Society, which he presented to me at an entertainment given him by the city. He accompanied it with very polite expressions of his esteem for me, having, as he said, been long acquainted with my character. After dinner, when the company, as was customary at that time,

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