Health and Mortality among Elderly Populations

By Graziella Caselli; Alan D. Lopez | Go to book overview

Preface

The promotion of research into leveis, patterns, trends, and causes of mortality has been a primary concern of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP) since its inception. For several decades, the activities of the IUSSP in relation to mortality studies have emphasized the need to provide reliable, sensitive tools to monitor and assess trends in child survival. This coincided with the focus of the international public health community on the prevention and control of infectious diseases. At the same time, evidence has been accumulating that the survival prospects of infants and children have increased markedly in many parts of the developing world, particularly Latin- America and East Asia, due in large part to the successful and sustained implementation of primary health care strategies. Concomitant with these successes, the chronic diseases have begun to emerge as major public health issues in a number of developing countries. The nature and extent of this epidemiological transition varies between countries, but essentially it is characterized by the progressive replacement of the leading causes of child death (i.e. acute-respiratory infections, diarrhoeal diseases, vaccine-preventable diseases, and malaria) by the major chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer, which are much more common among adults and the elderly.

It was with this realization in mind that the IUSSP Council decided in 1989 to establish a Committee on Adult Mortality, chaired by Alan Lopez of the World Health Organization, to prepare a series of scientific seminars on adult health and survival. The first of these seminars was concerned with causes and prevention of adult mortality in developing countries and was held in Santiago, Chile, in October 1991, being jointly sponsored by CELADE and the Pan American Health Organization. A second seminar on adult mortality in developed countries took place in Taormina, Italy in June 1992, bringing together epidemiologists, demographers, and other social scientists. The third and final seminar convened by the Committee was held in Sendai City, Japan, from 21-5 June 1993, entitled Health and Mortality Trends Among Elderly Populations: Determinants and Implications. This book is based on the thirty- one invited papers presented and discussed at the seminar.

The challenge in developing future public health and social policies for the elderly arises from three major trends in the characteristics of the elderly population. The first of these is the rapid increase in the number of old people, and especially the very old. As the effects of fertility change on age structure

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health and Mortality among Elderly Populations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 362

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.