The Media & Communications in Australia

By Stuart Cunningham; Graeme Turner | Go to book overview

Contributors

Mark Balnaves is Program Director of the Bachelor of Social Science program at the University of Queensland. An expert in research methods and the impact of new media, he is the author of Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods: An Investigative Approach and, with James Donald and Stephanie Hemelryk Donald, The Penguin Atlas of Media and Information. He has also published on social equity and telecommunications, the sociology of information and social psychology, and has produced multimedia coursework on descriptive statistics.

Trevor Barr is Professor, Media and Telecommunications, School of Social and Behavioural Sciences at Swinburne University in Melbourne. His latest book is newmedia.comau: The Changing Face of Australia's Media and Communications (Allen & Unwin, 2000). He has been employed as a senior adviser or consultant by a number of government and industry bodies, including the Commission for the Future, Telstra and Ericsson Australia.

Frances Bonner lectures in television, film and popular culture at the University of Queensland. She is co-author with Graeme Turner and P. David Marshall of Fame Games: The Production of Celebrity in Australia (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and has published a number of articles on health coverage in magazines written jointly with Susan McKay, as well as occasional articles on film and on science fiction. She is currently working on Ordinary Television, a study of non-fiction television for Sage in the United Kingdom.

Kate Bowles is a lecturer in film and television history in the Communication and Cultural Studies program at the University of Wollongong and co-editor (with Sue Turnbull) of Tomorrow Never Knows: Soaps on Australian Television (AFI, 1994).

Stuart Cunningham is Professor and Director of the Creative Industries Research and Applications Centre (CIRAC), Queensland University of Technology. He is

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