Learning to Win: Sports, Education, and Social Change in Twentieth-Century North Carolina

By Pamela Grundy | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIONS
2 Katie Lee Griffith, 1916
11 Livingstone College, 1910
19 University of North Carolina football team, 1890s
21 Football contest, 1892
25 Trinity College football players, 1890s
38 Shaw University football team, 1905
45 Shaw University students, 1909
49 Basketball players at the State Normal College, 1901
51 Presbyterian College team, 1908
58Charlotte News cartoon, 1907
61 Livingstone College students disguised as maids, 1910
64 Shaw University team, 1916
70 Lincolnton High School team, 1927
72 Second Ward High School men's team, 1927
77 Second Ward High School women's team, 1927
79 Shelby High School team, 1925
80 Pineville High School team, 1928
99 McCachren brothers, 1920s
104 University of North Carolina football action, 1930s
106 Lost football bet, 1930s
108 Frank Porter Graham, 1930s
121 Highland Park Mill basketball team, 1922
132 Women's team at Charlotte's Central High School, 1923
137 Livingstone College women's team, 1934
145 All-Star team, 1950
148 Hanes Hosiery takes on Chatham Mills, 1940s
151 Highland High School Ramlettes, 1949
156 Lincolnton High School state championship team, 1951
160 John B. McLendon Jr., 1940s
163 West Charlotte Lions, 1946
170 Ridgeview High School football team, 1962

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