Window on Freedom: Race, Civil Rights, and Foreign Affairs, 1945-1988

By Brenda Gayle Plummer | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Wayne Greenhaw, Watch Out for George Wallace (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1976), 2–3; Dan T. Carter, The Politics of Rage: George Wallace, the Origins of the New Conservatism, and the Transformation of American Politics (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995), 135–38.
2
See Citizen 7 (Nov. 1962), especially John B. Trevor, “Segregation: An Old African Custom,” 9–10. Segregationists first used Africa to illustrate the result of black rule following the Mau Mau revolt in Kenya in the early 1950s. See, for example, “Stop Mau Mau or Die!,” White Men's News (Sept. 1955): 172.
3
Robert Ruark, “Africa ‘Emerging’—Its a Crazy World!,” White Men's News (Sept. 1955): 13–14; “African Nations Emerging into Idiocy,” ibid. 8 (Oct. 1964), 15–16.
4
See, for example, cartoons in American Mercury 91 (Nov. 1960): 80; 93 (Jan. 1962): 19, 22; Timeweek Interview: “An African Premier,” Citizen 9 (Jan. 1965): 12–14.
5
Quoted in Robert Morris, “The Rush to Dismember the West,” American Standard 1 (Mar. 1962), 4–5. See also George Jordon, “African Witches Brew Concocted in Moscow,” American Mercury 92 (Jan. 1961): 19–21; Carter, The Politics of Rage, 237.
6
“The Congo,” The Cross and the Flag 21 (Jan. 1961); Dan Smoot Report, 3 Oct. 1960, 1; “Rape of White Women Legal after Independence,” Augusta Courier (Georgia), 20 June 1960, 4. Roy Harris, president of the Citizens Councils, was the editor of the Augusta Courier. See also Mark Sherwin, The Extremists (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1963), 103–4.
7
Roy Harris, “A Time for Optimism,” Citizen 7 (Jan. 1963): 7–12; Amos Koontz, “‘Uhuru’ Does Not Confer ‘Equality,’” ibid. 8 (Nov. 1963): 6–10.
8
Augusta Courier, 20 June 1960, 1; James Graham Cook, The Segregationists (New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1962), 113–14; William J. Turner, Power on the Right (Berkeley: Ramparts, 1971), 32.
9
The Cross and the Flag 21 (Feb. 1963): 23–24; Ruth Alexander, “Violence in the Congo Is Reminiscent of Tragedy of Reconstruction in the South,” Citizen 7 (Nov. 1962): 11–12; Carter, The Politics of Rage, 120.
10
Richard D. Mahoney, JFK: Ordeal in Africa (New York: Oxford University Press, 1983), 119, 135–37, and Stephen Weissman, American Foreign Policy in the Congo, 1960–1964 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1974), 168–69; Ernest van den Haag, The War in Katanga (New York: American Committee for Aid to Katanga Freedom Fighters, 1962), often quoted in segregationist publications.
11
Thomas J. Noer, Cold War and Black Liberation: The United States and White Rule in Africa, 1948–1968 (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1985), 74–76; “The Case for Portugal,” Weekly Crusader 3 (7 Sept. 1962); Daniel M. Friedenberg, “The Public Relations of Colonialism: Salazar's Mouthpiece in the U.S.,” Africa Today 9 (Apr. 1972): 4–16.
12
John Trevor, “Facts vs. Fiction in South Africa,” Citizen 11 (Jan. 1965): 7–8; Cook, Segregationists, 81.
13
New York Times, 6 Dec. 1962, 9; 8 Mar. 1963, 8. See also Colin Gonze, “With Ellender in Africa,” Africa Today 10 (May 1963): 4–6.
14
William Simmons, “Report on a Trip to Southern Africa,” Citizen 10 (July—Aug. 1966): 4–14; Kenneth Tolliver, “Traveler's Report on Southern Africa,” ibid. 11 (July—Aug. 1967): 4–13.

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