Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 3

By St Augustine; John W. Rettig | Go to book overview

TRACTATE 32

On John 7.37-39

AMID THE disputes and doubts of the Jews about the Lord Jesus Christ among the other things that he said by which some were confounded [and] others were taught, on that "last day of the festivity" (for these things were being done then) which is called Scenopegia, that is, the building of tents—and you remember, my beloved people, this festivity has previously been discussed 1.—the Lord Jesus Christ calls, and this not merely by speaking, but by crying out, that he who thirsts may come to him. If we thirst, let us come, and not on foot, 2. but in our feelings; let us come not by traveling but by loving. Though, according to the interior man, he who loves also travels. To travel by the body is one thing, by the heart another. He who changes place by movement of the body travels by the body; he who changes his feeling by the movement of his heart travels by the heart. If you love one thing, [but] you were loving another, you are not there where you were.

2. Therefore, the Lord cries out to us. "He stood and cried out, 'If anyone thirsts, let him come to me and drink. He who believes in me, as the Scripture says, out of his belly there shall flow rivers of living water.'" 3. Since the Evangelist has ex‐

____________________
1.
Cf. Tractate 28.3, 9.
2.
Berrouard BA 72.664 notes here a reminiscence of Plotinus Enneads 1.6.8. Reality exists not in the external, physical world but in our true homeland where our Father is and which we can reach only internally, through the soul.
3.
The reference to the Old Testament is not at all clear; R. E. Brown, The Anchor Bible 29.321-23, discusses the various possible sources. It should also be pointed out that Augustine does not deal with a punctuation problem here, undoubtedly because Augustine only knows this punctuation, as the lengthy

-41-

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Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Fathers of the Church - A New Translation *
  • The Fathers of the Church - A New Translation *
  • Tractates on the Gospel of John 28-54 *
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Select Bibliography ix
  • Tractates 28-54 *
  • Tractate 28 - On John 7.1-13 3
  • Tractate 29 - On John 7.14-18 14
  • Tractate 30 - On John 7.19-24 22
  • Tractate 31 - On John 7.25-36 30
  • Tractate 32 - On John 7.37-39 41
  • Tractate 33 - On John 7.40-53: 8.I-II 51
  • Tractate 34 - On John 8.12 60
  • Tractate 35 - On John 8.13-14 71
  • Tractate 36 - On John 8.15-18 81
  • Tractate 37 - On John 8.19-20 95
  • Tractate 38 - On John 8.21-25 105
  • Tractate 39 - On John 8.25-27 116
  • Tractate 40 - On John 8.28-32 124
  • Tractate 41 - On John 8.31-36 135
  • Tractate 42 - On John 8.37-47 150
  • Tractate 43 - On John 8.48-59 163
  • Tractate 44 - On John 9 175
  • Tractate 45 - On John 10.1-10 187
  • Tractate 46 - On John 10.11-13 203
  • Tractate 47 - On John 10.14-21 212
  • Tractate 48 - On John 10.22-42 228
  • Tractate 49 - On John Ii.I-54 238
  • Tractate 50 - On John 11.55-12.11 260
  • Tractate 51 - On John 12.12-26 271
  • Tractate 52 - On John 12.27-36 280
  • Tractate 53 - On John 12.37-43 290
  • Tractate 54 - On John 12.44-50 301
  • Indices *
  • General Index 311
  • Index of Holy Scripture 321
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