Advances and New Directions

By Silvano Arieti; H. Keith H. Brodie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3

BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS
AND PSYCHIATRY

Thomas A. Wehr

Frederick K. Goodwin

Our body is like a clock; if one wheel be amiss, all the rest are disordered, the whole fabric suffers: with such admirable art and harmony is a man composed.

Robert Burton,
The Anatomy of Melancholy (1628)


¶ Introduction

RHYTHMS IN NATURE—the alternation of day and night, the tides and the seasons—govern our lives and structure our experience. The degree to which nature's cycles influence culture is obvious. Less obvious is the fact that they are also impressed upon our genes, for we generate within ourselves days, months, and seasons that mirror and anticipate the rhythmic changes around us. Our biological rhythms make each of us a microcosm of the geophysical world.

Unlike the motions of the planets, biological clocks are imprecise, and their synchronization with external rhythms depends upon their being continually reset. For this purpose we possess special sense organs that lock onto external time cues such as the rising and setting of the sun and that make corresponding adjustments. As we live out our lives, our biological self is always tuned to the rhythms of the world around us, and we are forced to keep time with its march.

Our internal rhythms constitute a kind of temporal anatomy. Each day our body's temperature rises from a predawn nadir to its evening peak. At night the pineal gland secretes a hormone, melatonin. When we fall asleep, growth hormone briefly appears. The adrenals emerge from quiescence abruptly in the middle of sleep and are most active at dawn. And nearly every function of the organism exhibits a 24-hour, or circadian, pattern of variation with its own characteristic timing and waveform. The classical principle of homeostasis must be amended to encompass such physiological variation: cyclic

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advances and New Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 856

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.