The Making of the English Literary Canon: From the Middle Ages to the Late Eighteenth Century

By Trevor Ross | Go to book overview

Notes

I have modernized i/j and u/v throughout. I have retained original capitalization and punctuation, except in passages quoted from modern editions where these have been emended.


INTRODUCTION
1
Julie A. Smith traces the history of this symbolism in "The Poet Laure- ate as University Master: John Skelton's Woodcut Portrait," in Renais- sance Rereadings, ed. Maryanne Cline Horowitz et al. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press 1988), 159-83.
2
The frontispiece appears before the reprint volume, The Universal Visiter and Memorialist. For the Year 1756 (London 1756).
3
The periodical could also include one of Johnson's satires on the pro- liferation of authors that, he claimed, left so few readers that "every man must be content to read his book to himself' [1 (April 1756): 162]. The remark, however, suggests how much consumption had by Johnson's age become the measure of production.
4
"Reproduced" here refers to the activities of both physical preservation (printing, libraries, etc.) and cultural transmission (the institutions of criticism, pedagogy, etc.) This is the sense in which John Guillory uses the term in his entry for "Canon" in Critical Terms for Literary Study, ed. Frank Lentricchia and Thomas McLaughlin (Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1990), 233-49. Guillory rightly notes that canon- formation, at least in its modern conception, involves both the evalua- tion and the preservation of literary works: acts of judgment, he

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The Making of the English Literary Canon: From the Middle Ages to the Late Eighteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Making of the English Literary Canon - From the Middle Ages to the Late Eighteenth Century *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - Versions of Canonic Harmony *
  • 1 - Early Gestures *
  • Part Two - Consequences of Presentism *
  • 2 - Albion's Parnassus and the Professional Author *
  • 3 - The Uses of the Dead *
  • Part Three - Defining a Cultural Field *
  • 4 - Value into Knowledge *
  • 5 - The Fall of Apollo *
  • Part Four - Consumption and Canonic Hierarchy *
  • 6 - Reading the Canon *
  • 7 - A Basis for Criticism *
  • Epilogue - How Poesy Became Literature *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
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