The Global Warming Desk Reference

By Bruce E. Johansen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Warming Seas

Because humankind is a narcissistic species, our focus, when considering the implications of global warming, usually is fixed on the third of the planet that comprises dry land. While the land warms, the other two-thirds of the Earth will be warming as well, with profound implications for the species which inhabit it, including a holocaust for coral reefs which already has begun.

According to Peter G. Brewer and associates, writing in Science, the chemistry of ocean water already is being changed by human-induced greenhouse gases in the atmosphere: “The invading wave of atmospheric CO2 has already altered the chemistry of surface seawater worldwide, and over much of the ocean, this tracer field has now permeated to a depth of more than one kilometer” (Brewer et al. 1999, 943). Given that the ocean is slowly warming, as its carbon dioxide level rises, its capacity as a carbon sink is probably being compromised.

Ken Caldeira and Philip B. Duffy assert in Science that “uptake,” or removal, of human-induced carbon dioxide by the oceans is less than many earlier investigators have assumed and that, as temperatures warm, carbon uptake will diminish further. Additionally, Caldeira and Duffy contend that absorption of carbon into the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere (the focus of their study) has been diminishing since 1880 when fossil-fuel effluvia became a factor in the composition of the atmosphere. “Ventilation of the deep Southern Ocean was much more vigorous in the period from about 1350 to 1880 than in the recent past” (Caldeira and Duffy 2000, 620).

Among the important results of warming seas will be coastal erosion, shoreline inundation because of higher tide levels, higher storm surges, and saltwater intrusion into coastal estuaries and groundwater supplies. A report by the World Wildlife Fund said: “Scientific evidence strongly suggests that global climate change already is affecting a broad spectrum of marine species and ecosystems,

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Global Warming Desk Reference
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface: Diary of a Warm Winter vii
  • Introduction xiii
  • References xvii
  • Chapter 1 - A Sketch of the Problem 1
  • Chapter 2 - The General Consensus on Global Warming 33
  • Chapter 3 - Warmer is Better; Richer is Healthier: Global-Warming Skeptics 83
  • Chapter 4 - Icemelt: Glacial, Arctic, and Antarctic 123
  • Chapter 5 - Warming Seas 153
  • References 177
  • Chapter 6 - Flora and Fauna 183
  • Chapter 7 - Human Health 209
  • References 218
  • Chapter 8 - A Fact of Daily Life: Global Warming and Indigenous Peoples 221
  • Chapter 9 - Greenhouse Gases and the Weather: Now, and in the Year 2100 231
  • Chapter 10 - Possible Solutions 251
  • Postscript 275
  • References 279
  • Bibliography 281
  • Index 345
  • About the Author 355
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.