People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words

By John M. Kistler | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Foreword

Bernard Rollin, Ph.D.

Efforts to raise the moral and legal status of animals in society represent one of the most fervid and powerful international social movements of the last three decades. This movement has been remarkably effective in changing accepted practices in virtually all traditional animal uses, from agriculture to zoos. The legislative elimination of confinement agriculture in Sweden; the advent of laws regulating animal research throughout the Western world; the public assault (by referendum) on management of wildlife for hunters; the significant proliferation of animal protection legislation around the world; the rise of university courses on ethics and animals; law school research on raising the status of animals from property; the phenomenal economic growth of cosmetic companies which disavow animal testing; all of these new activities bespeak the power of human moral concern for animals to effect major social change. Yet there has been remarkably little study of this movement, perhaps because it is so often ridiculed and dismissed as “fringe.”

What we do know—most animal advocates are female, well-educated, affluent—is based on minute samples and tells us virtually nothing of substance. Above all, interested parties can get no qualitative “feel” for the sort of people who resolutely advocate for animals, or for the inevitable opponents they create.

John Kistler’s book helps fill this void by presenting us with qualitative self-portraits, in their own words, of a sample of animal advocates and those dedicated to opposing them. People profiled range from a spokesman for the radical Animal Liberation Front to the longtime chief representative of the biomedical research lobby. All respond

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?