Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview

repayment of that people whose example we follow. We must survey with the heart's eye the statement at the end of the psalm, that we must direct ourselves with total concentration of mind towards the Lord's justifications, living within His law. If we have obtained temporal blessings, as Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and the rest of the faithful who flourished with copious resources did, we must none the less concentrate on the means by which we can be guided to the kingdom of heaven. The things which make the world seem attractive have no place in eternity. We must remember that this is the second of the psalms 49 which in relating the miracles conferred on the Jews announce the future sacraments of the Christian people by the figure of allegory, which says one thing but means another. 50


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 105

I. Alleluia. Observe once more the return to us of alleluia-joys. This is a brief instruction that we must sing to the Lord with rejoicing throughout the psalm. But let us observe that we find no change in the heading, or in the reason for it, from the previous one. The heading is Alleluia, the reason is confession, which is wondrously and exceedingly fruitful for praising the Lord. How many mouths has this theme opened? With it Moses and the men, and his sister Mary with the women, celebrated the crossing of the Red Sea in God's praise. 1 With it Deborah sang out in happy exultation; 2 many of the prophets too poured forth various songs in proclaiming so great a miracle, and rightly, for these miracles attest the mysteries of the entire redemption of men. We are delivered from the Egyptians when by God's gift we are freed from the works of the devil. We cross the Red Sea when we receive the sacrament of baptism. We are fed in the desert when through the dispensation of divine grace we get our fill from the bestowal of the good things of this world. We are led to the land of promise when through the gift of heavenly devotion we enter the blessed native land. It is right, then, that this theme should be often repeated and proclaimed, for it is adorned with the foreshadowing of such great marvels.

-65-

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Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ancient Christian Writers - The Works of the Fathers in Translation *
  • Cassiodorus: Explanation of the Psalms *
  • Contents v
  • Commentary on Psalm 101 i
  • Commentary on Psalm 102 18
  • Commentary on Psalm 103 29
  • Commentary on Psalm 104 49
  • Commentary on Psalm 105 65
  • Commentary on Psalm 106 82
  • Commentary on Psalm 107 95
  • Commentary on Psalm 108 102
  • Commentary on Psalm 109 116
  • Commentary on Psalm 110 125
  • Commentary on Psalm III 131
  • Commentary on Psalm 112 137
  • Commentary on Psalm 113 141
  • Commentary on Psalm 114 150
  • Commentary on Psalm 115 155
  • Commentary on Psalm 116 160
  • Commentary on Psalm 117 162
  • Commentary on Psalm 118 174
  • Commentary on Psalm 119 259
  • Commentary on Psalm 120 265
  • Commentary on Psalm 121 270
  • Commentary on Psalm 122 277
  • Commentary on Psalm 123 281
  • Commentary on Psalm 124 287
  • Commentary on Psalm 125 291
  • Commentary on Psalm 126 296
  • Commentary on Psalm 127 301
  • Commentary on Psalm 128 306
  • Commentary on Psalm 129 311
  • Commentary on Psalm 130 316
  • Commentary on Psalm 131 321
  • Commentary on Psalm 132 332
  • Commentary on Psalm 133 337
  • Commentary on Psalm 134 341
  • Commentary on Psalm 135 351
  • Commentary on Psalm 136 359
  • Commentary on Psalm 137 365
  • Commentary on Psalm 138 371
  • Commentary on Psalm 139 386
  • Commentary on Psalm 140 392
  • Commentary on Psalm 141 399
  • Commentary on Psalm 142 406
  • Commentary on Psalm 143 413
  • Commentary on Psalm 144 422
  • Commentary on Psalm 145 432
  • Commentary on Psalm 146 438
  • Commentary on Psalm 147 444
  • Commentary on Psalm 148 449
  • Commentary on Psalm 149 457
  • Commentary on Psalm 150 461
  • Notes 471
  • Indexes 525
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